The Charles Hosmer - Morse Museum of American Art


On Exhibit

Exhibitions in the Museum’s galleries are changed periodically to enable the public to see more of the permanent collection and to bring a broader understanding of developments in American art. Current exhibitions on view include:

  • Louis Comfort Tiffany’s
    Laurelton Hall

    Ongoing

    The Morse Museum’s new wing provides, for the first time, long-term public access to its collection of art and architectural objects from Louis Comfort Tiffany’s celebrated Long Island home, Laurelton Hall.
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  • Louis Comfort Tiffany’s Life and Art

    Ongoing

    Reflecting on his artistic career at a celebration of his 68th birthday in 1916, Louis Comfort Tiffany characterized his work across various media as a lifelong “quest of beauty.” Few artists have been as energetic or as successful as was Tiffany (1848–1933) in establishing that aesthetic ideal in the American home. Louis Comfort Tiffany’s Life and Art examines through art objects, archival documents, and artifacts Tiffany’s astonishingly diverse work in the decorative arts over the course of his lifetime.
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  • Lullaby and Goodnight—Children’s Literature from the Morse Collection

    October 29, 2013 through January 11, 2015

    The charming characters and whimsical prose of late 19th-century children’s literature found their source in a grander plan to instill beauty from the earliest years. This exhibition focuses on three authors and illustrators noted for their pioneering contributions to children’s literature: Kate Greenaway (1846–1901), Mary Dow Brine (1836–1925), and Eulalie Osgood Grover (1873–1958). Their work, in the context of the period, can be seen as part of the Aesthetic movement (1870–90), a crusade that sought to infuse all objects with beauty and, in turn, elevate the quality of life of all who surrounded themselves with it.
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  • Lifelines—Forms and Themes of Art Nouveau

    Ongoing

    In French, Art Nouveau literally means “new art,” and at the turn of the 20th century, this new art looked different, felt different, and reflected different values and ideas. Through more than 100 objects from the Museum’s collection, this exhibition explores the interrelated elements that define this style so well known for its lively line and organic form. The exhibition—featuring furniture, architectural ornaments, lamps, jewelry, ceramics, and art glass from more than 50 makers, designers, and artists working across nine countries—is organized into groups that illustrate such dominant Art Nouveau themes as nature, female form, and metamorphosis.
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  • Arts and Crafts from the Morse Collection

    Ongoing

    “Have nothing in your houses which you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful,” William Morris declared in 1880. Morris (1834–96) was a leader of the Arts and Crafts movement, which originated in Britain in the late nineteenth century and soon spread to America. This gallery highlights Arts and Crafts objects from the Museum's collection.
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  • Vignette: The Art of Fountain Pens

    February 12, 2013 through January 11, 2015

    Developed in the late 19th century and ubiquitous until the 1970s, fountain pens—the kind filled from a bottle of ink—were ingenious and often beautifully designed and handcrafted. This exhibit of about 100 American writing instruments manufactured between 1875 and 1975 shows many of the major technological and design innovations made through the years by such great names of the industry as Parker, L.E. Waterman, Wahl-Eversharp, and W.A. Sheaffer.
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  • Focus Exhibition: Lockwood De Forest’s The Wreck

    October 23, 2012 through September 27, 2015

    The Wreck, an 1880 oil painting by American artist and decorator Lockwood de Forest (1850–1932), depicts five Bedouins riding their camels across a distant horizon and in the foreground, the skeletal remains of a camel—the wreck of the painting’s title. A recent bequest from the estate of de Forest’s great-granddaughter, this 36-by-48-inch Orientalist picture is on view for the first time after extensive conservation. Metaphorically, the theme of the work is life and death and the basic struggle of human existence. The exhibition includes other de Forest oil studies from the collection and photo-and-essay panels designed to help the viewer develop a full appreciation of the painting’s creation, context, and symbolism.
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  • Tiffany Chapel

    Ongoing

    The celebrated chapel interior that Louis Comfort Tiffany created for exhibition at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago opened as an exhibition at the Morse in April 1999, becoming available to the public for the first time in more than 100 years. The mosaic and glass masterpiece, a testament to his design genius, established Tiffany’s reputation internationally.
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  • Secrets of Tiffany Glassmaking

    Ongoing

    Updated installation opened September 4, 2012. Through photographs, models, tools, and art objects, this teaching exhibit shows the range of Louis Comfort Tiffany’s glass production, from mosaics and molded-glass jewels to leaded-glass windows and lamps, providing insights into the techniques employed by his artisans.
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  • Paintings from the Morse Collection

    Ongoing

    This recently updated gallery of primarily American paintings features more than 20 works representing a variety of late 19th-century styles, including portraiture, genre scenes, and landscapes.
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  • Art Jewelry, Favrile Metalwork & Precious Glass by Louis Comfort Tiffany

    Ongoing

    This permanent gallery features about three dozen objects, including 11 pieces of jewelry that Tiffany designed for the new art jewelry division he established at Tiffany & Co. after his father died in 1905.
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  • Selected Works of Louis Comfort Tiffany from the Morse Collection

    Ongoing

    The first three galleries at the Morse have been installed with more than a hundred objects representing the remarkable diversity of work by Louis Comfort Tiffany. The installation includes 15 leaded-glass windows, as well as more than a hundred examples of Tiffany art glass, metalwork, lamps, and pottery.
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